In the recently published ‘Recycled Sustainable 3D Printing Materials for Marine Environments,’ the authors—involved in the Bio-Shelters Project—venture into the realm of sustainability and recycling in 3D printing, but they also heavily explore the ever-growing science of materials during a three-phase project made up of not only designers and architects but also experts in materials and marine ecology. Not afraid to work with materials that might be considered ‘radically innovative and experimental,’ the researchers are focused on applying their findings to marine applications: “The approach to the material design of this project in this current phase is based on the same principle as commercially available sustainable filament products including recycled wood filaments, recycled brick filaments and, recently, algal filament,” explain the authors. “These products rely on a certain percentage of base-bonding material such as ABS plastic or PLA to ensure fabrication stability during printing as the base materials melt at a consistent temperature, ensuring consistent bonding of each subsequent layer.” In many cases, the teams working with the Bio-Shelters project are required to ...