Sonos Can’t Get Out of Its Own Way as It Makes Yet Another Blunder

Founded in 1993 by brothers Tom and David Gardner, The Motley Fool helps millions of people attain financial freedom through our website, podcasts, books, newspaper column, radio show, and premium investing services. Rich has been a Fool since 1998 and writing for the site since 2004. After 20 years of patrolling the mean streets of suburbia, he hung up his badge and gun to take up a pen full time. Having made the streets safe for Truth, Justice, and Krispy Kreme donuts, he now patrols the markets looking for companies he can lock up as long-term holdings in a portfolio. His coverage reflects his passion for motorcycles, booze, and guns (though typically not all exercised at the same time), but his writing also covers the broader sectors of consumer goods, technology, and industrials. So follow along as he tries to break down complex topics to make them more understandable and useful to the average investor. The third time is definitely not the charm for Sonos (NASDAQ:SONO). The high-end sound specialist has tripped itself up yet again, this time accidentally exposing the email addresses of some of its customers.  Although the breach was for only a few hundred names, and they we...

Sleeping In A Cold Room Helps You Fall Asleep Faster And Is

You might already be trying to keep it cool at night (if you have AC) during the summer as best you can & if you are it might not be great for your PG&E bill, but it looks like it’s better for your health. Per the Harvard Medical School, sleeping in a cold room will help you fall asleep faster. Your body is already trying to cool down right before sleep so this helps to expedite that process, therefore putting you to sleep quicker. According to Science, Sleeping in a Cold Room Leads to Better, Healthier Sleep https://t.co/PrqUIWoafi What counts as a cold room? The U.S. National Institute of Health would consider that 66 degrees & they say that sleeping in a room at that temperature will increase your metabolism & reduces the risk of metabolic illnesses. Cold Room Oh, and sleeping in a cold room can help reduce insomnia. Insomniacs have a higher body temperature when they’re sleeping and the University of Southern Australia deduced that a lower room temperature can help lead to a small temperature change in an insomniac’s body, which is crucial to helping them drift off to sleep. Sleep Advisor says that all of the above leads to reduced stress t...